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National Standards Collaborative Board Releases World-Readiness Standards for Learning Languages

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: Paul Sandrock
(703) 894-2900 x131

Alexandria, VA—The National Standards Collaborative Board  is proud to announce the release of the newly-revised World-Readiness Standards for Learning Languages: Fourth Edition.

The World-Readiness Standards for Learning Languages define the central role of world languages in the learning career of every student. The five goal areas of the Standards establish an inextricable link between communication and culture, which is applied in making connections and comparisons and in using this competence to be part of local and global communities. The Standards create a roadmap to guide learners to develop competence to communicate effectively and interact with cultural competence to participate in multilingual communities at home and around the world.

“With the emphasis in every discipline on college and career readiness, these new Standards for learning languages focus directly on the development of stronger literacy for all learners, K-16, with the added value of world-readiness,” says Jacqueline Bott Van Houten, American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages President . “Language learners deal with using multiple strategies to make meaning and express themselves, expanding their literacy strategies while also learning to communicate and interact with and within other cultures.”

First published in 1996 as the Standards for Foreign Language Learning, the World-Readiness Standards for Learning Languages represent an unprecedented consensus among educators, business leaders, government, and the community on the definition and role of language instruction in American education. In the nearly 20 years since release of the original standards, the document has been used by teachers, administrators, and curriculum developers at both state and local levels to improve foreign language education in our nation's schools and postsecondary institutions. In addition, they have provided the basis for national initiatives such as standards for teacher education programs, as well as for National Board Certification.

“The revised Standards are reflective of what the language teaching profession has learned over the past years. The added layer of detail of performance indicators for novice, intermediate, and advanced learners at different developmental levels is a great addition that will serve teachers and learners well.”

Keith Cothrun, Executive Director, American Association of Teachers of German (AATG)

The following language-specific standards documents are also available (as eBooks only) for purchase together with the World-Readiness Standards: American Sign Language (ASL), Arabic, Chinese, Classical Languages (Latin/Greek), French, German, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Scandinavian Languages, and Spanish.

“The new Standards volume, along with new language-specific standards, will be an invaluable resource for the language field. The addition of proficiency range designations for new Sample Progress Indicators and new Learning Scenarios will help both instructors and learners as they move forward. For example, the opportunity to revise Standards for Learning Russian allowed for the inclusion of post-secondary examples, a major step forward for the Russian field.”

Representatives of the American Council of Teachers of Russian (ACTR) Task Force on Standards

The World-Readiness Standards are available for purchase in four unique combinations:

  • The World-Readiness Standards volume (print) plus all fourteen language-specific eBooks
  • The World-Readiness Standards volume (eBook) plus all fourteen language-specific eBooks
  • The World-Readiness Standards volume (print) plus one language-specific eBook
  • The World-Readiness Standards volume (eBook) plus one language-specific eBook

ACTFL’s Executive Director, Marty Abbott, notes, “These refreshed Standards are familiar in their organization around the original five goal areas, but the descriptors point to what is new, identifying the critical thinking skills and creativity that one needs to acquire a new language.” Abbott goes on to say, “The 21st century learner faces a future of work that increasingly requires collaboration and communication with people from other cultures, whether on a local assembly line or in a boardroom across the globe. What better preparation than to experience firsthand how language functions and how cultures influence each other? That is the language classroom or virtual learning environment envisioned by these new Standards.”

The National Standards in Foreign Language Education Project is a collaborative effort of the American Association of Teachers of Arabic, American Association of Teachers of French, American Association of Teachers of German, American Association of Teachers of Italian, American Association of Teachers of Japanese, American Association of Teachers of Korean, American Association of Teachers of Modern Greek, American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese, American Classical League, American Council of Teachers of Russian, American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, American Sign Language Teachers Association, Chinese Language Association of Secondary-Elementary Schools, Chinese Language Teachers Association, Modern Language Association, National Council of Less Commonly Taught Languages, and National Standards Task Force for Hindi.

Read more information about the Standards and purchase.

Date: 
Thursday, April 9, 2015