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The U.S. Department of Education has established its first-ever, fully articulated international strategy. The strategy is designed to simultaneously advance two strategic goals: strengthening U.S. education and advancing our nation’s international priorities. The strategy reflects the value and necessity of:

The Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts (ELA) and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects contains four strands: Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language.  These four strands are represented in the National Standards for Learning Languages by the Communication standards (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational) and the level of proficiency demonstrated.   In addition, the standards of the other four goals areas for learning languages – Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities – also support and are aligned with the Common Core.  These standards describe the expectations to ensure all students are college-, career-, and world-ready.

More than forty language educators from the United and Europe met recently in Provo, Utah to explore common understandings about language proficiency as shared by the ACTFL and the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) Communities.

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