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The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) has named Dr. John Brademas, former Majority Whip of the U.S. House of Representatives, as 2008 winner of the ACTFL Edwin Cudecki Award for Support for Language Education.  The award, which recognizes individuals who have developed ties between international business, language education and international studies, was presented at the November 20 Assembly of Delegates at ACTFL’s 2008 Annual Convention and World Languages Expo in Orlando, FL.

More than 5500 language teachers and administrators will come together to celebrate the growing interest in language programs in the U.S. at the 42nd Annual Convention and World Languages Expo convened by The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) on November 21-23 Orlando, FL.   The association will stage this conference and exhibition at the city’s Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin Resort, focusing on a theme of “Opening Minds to the World Through Languages.” 

Language Educator Janine Erickson was introduced as the new President-Elect of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) at the association’s November 2007 annual conference in San Antonio, TX.  She will serve in that position on the ACTFL Board of Directors through 2008, assuming the role of President in 2009.

Eileen Glisan, a professor of Spanish and foreign language education at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where she is also coordinator of the K-12 Spanish Education Program, was elected as president-elect of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). The election results were announced at the association's November Annual Convention and World Languages Expo in Orlando, FL. Glisan begins a three-year term on the ACTFL Board of Directors Executive Committee and will serve as ACTFL President in 2010.

Janet Glass, a teacher of Spanish at Dwight-Englewood School, Englewood, NJ, has been named the recipient of the 2008 ACTFL National Language Teacher of the Year Award by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL).  The presentation was made at the association’s 41st Annual Conference and Exposition on November 16, 2007 in San Antonio, TX.

The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) has announced the five regional finalists for the third annual ACTFL National Language Teacher of the Year Award.  The winner will be announced at the November 16 Opening General Session of ACTFL’s November 15-18 convention in San Antonio, TX.

The Board of Directors, members and staff of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) join the nation, the Virginia Tech family and the foreign language education community in mourning the horrible tragedy of April 16.  Through thoughts and prayers, we offer our condolences and support to the families, friends and all those who are dealing with the loss of loved ones.

The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL), in partnership with the Board of International Language Coordination (BILC), has been awarded a multi-year contract to develop a NATO-sponsored standardized English Language Testing Program.  The goal of this program, which is to be funded by NATO, is to provide feedback to NATO nations on the English abilities of their tested personnel and improve commensurability across national language testing programs.

The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) has announced the five regional finalists for the second annual ACTFL National Language Teacher of the Year Award.  The winner will be announced at the November 17 Opening General Session of ACTFL’s November 16-19 conference in Nashville, TN.

The nation’s largest professional association of language educators has seized on the Iraq Study Group’s recent report to President Bush as a call for action to deal with America’s growing language gap.  The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) put the focus on the report’s conclusion that American interests suffer because of limited language skills.

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