@ACTFL ON TWITTER

ACTFL ACTFL's critical resources are available in MOBI and EPUB formats for popular e-readers like iPad, Kindle, and Nook t.co/TKf2jrlyCR
ACTFL @msfrenchteach Sorry about that! Email membership@actfl.org and we'll make sure it works for you.

Online Store

Print This

Use of the Target Language in the Classroom

Research indicates that effective language instruction must provide significant levels of meaningful communication* and interactive feedback in the target language in order for students to develop language and cultural proficiency. The pivotal role of target-language interaction in language learning is emphasized in the K-16 Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century. ACTFL therefore recommends that language educators and their students use the target language as exclusively as possible (90% plus) at all levels of instruction during instructional time and, when feasible, beyond the classroom. In classrooms that feature maximum target-language use, instructors use a variety of strategies to facilitate comprehension and support meaning making. For example, they:

  1. provide comprehensible input that is directed toward communicative goals;
  2. make meaning clear through body language, gestures, and visual support;
  3. conduct comprehension checks to ensure understanding;
  4. negotiate meaning with students and encourage negotiation among students;
  5. elicit talk that increases in fluency, accuracy, and complexity over time;
  6. encourage self-expression and spontaneous use of language;
  7. teach students strategies for requesting clarification and assistance when faced with comprehension difficulties; and
  8. offer feedback to assist and improve students’ ability to interact orally in the target language.

*Communication for a classical language refers to an emphasis on reading ability and for American Sign Language (ASL) to signed communicative ability.