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Keynote Address: Creating Innovators with Passion, Play and Purpose by Tony Wagner

The 2013 Opening General Session features a keynote address by Tony Wagner, Harvard University’s first innovation education fellow at the Technology & Entrepreneurship Center. Dr. Wagner is an educator and widely published author whose career has included work as a high school teacher, K-8 principal, university professor in teacher education, and a founding executive director of Educators for Social Responsibility. He was also the founder of the Change Leadership Group at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and served as the group’s co-director for more than a decade. His keynote address, “Creating Innovators with Passion, Play and Purpose”, demonstrates how language educators can help their students become the 21st century’s next generation of creative innovators.


Plenary Session: The Tipping Point – Language Learning for a Changed World by Carl Blyth, Noah Geisel, Felix Kronenberg, and Kevin Gaugler

It is commonplace to say that schools are broken. But according to Sugata Mitra, educational visionary, schools aren’t broken. Rather, they are obsolete. This plenary begins with a radical assertion: our schools have reached the tipping point—they no longer meet the needs of the present generation who prefers to learn new kinds of content in new ways. In this plenary, four language educators share their stories of re-imagining their classrooms, their practices and their professional values in an age of profound social and technological change. Despite their differences, all four educators agree that a new design for language learning includes the following features: open educational resources (OER); adaptive, personalized curricula; collaborative learning communities; participatory culture; and integrative learning spaces.


Keys to Planning for Student Learning: Focus on Unit Design by Donna Clementi and Laura Terrill

Participants examine guidelines for choosing unit themes suggested in Keys to Planning for Student Learning. They discuss the degree to which their school’s or district’s current textbook or curriculum themes meet the suggested guidelines. Through examination of a model unit of instruction, participants also identify how the 5 Cs of the National Standards are represented in the unit. You will learn how 21st Century Skills and Common Core Standards are integrated into the unit plan. The concept of a “toolbox” to complete the unit plan is explained. Essential language functions and vocabulary for the toolbox that help students successfully meet the unit goals will be discussed. Sample learning activities to strengthen cultural understandings and deepen content knowledge while building communication skills will be shared. Finally, the presenters will address how Open Source sharing of unit plans is facilitated by common templates and common definitions of pedagogical terms.

 


Donna Clementi is currently teaching foreign language methods at Lawrence University, Appleton, WI. She recently retired from Concordia Language Villages where she served in numerous positions for over 30 years, including Dean of the French Village and more recently as Director of Education and Research. She taught French for 33 years at Appleton West High School. She received the ACTFL Florence Steiner Award for Leadership in Foreign Language Education (K-12) and the Central States Founders Award. Donna is a frequent presenter at state, regional, and national conferences.


Laura Terrill taught French at all levels for 21 years before becoming the Coordinator of Foreign Language and English as a Second Language and then Director of Curriculum in the Parkway School District in St. Louis, MO. She has taught methods courses at Washington University in St. Louis and at Butler University and IUPUI in Indianapolis and continues to present frequently at the state, regional and national levels. She has served on the Board of Directors for Central States and ACTFL. She is the recipient of the Founders Award for Central States and has been named a NADSFL District Supervisor of the Year. She is currently working as an independent consultant.


Assessing Performance – Using AAPPL to Improve Language Learning by Paul Sandrock and Danielle Tezcan

Assessment designed as an authentic application of the three modes of communication provides models for educators’ instructional strategies that strengthen learners’ language performance. Learners benefit from knowing how and how well they should demonstrate use of the target language and what it takes to move from novice to intermediate and from intermediate to advanced levels of performance. In this session, participants experience how ACTFL’s Assessment of Performance toward Proficiency in Languages (AAPPL) supports language learning and informs curriculum.


Paul Sandrock, Director of Education at the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL), directs this national organization’s professional development and initiatives around standards, curriculum, instruction, and performance assessment. Previously, Paul was Assistant Director of Content and Learning at the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, beginning that state's implementation of Common Core State Standards, and earlier served as the state consultant for world languages. Paul taught Spanish for 16 years in middle school and high school and authored The Keys to Assessing Language Performance and Planning Curriculum for Learning World Languages.

 


Danielle Tezcan serves as the Principal Project Specialist at the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). She is a former teacher of Spanish language and literature, with 12 years of classroom experience from grades 9-16. Danielle is a senior member of the development team of the ACTFL Assessment of Performance towards Proficiency (AAPPL). During her 10 years at ACTFL, Danielle has developed content in Spanish for Reading Diagnostics; the K-12 Spanish computerized oral proficiency interview, and; an online listening and reading comprehension assessment for Tri-Services. She was the project director of several curriculum and/or assessment projects to the Defense Language Institute and the Tri-Services as well as a project to revise the materials used by the Peace Corps in their Language Tester Training Program.


Global possibilities for Students Helping Students Reach their Linguistic Destinations by Carmen Scoggins

When we do not know where we are going, we use a GPS. Shouldn’t students do the same thing to reach their linguistic destinations? Teachers can offer students what a GPS offers its users – address (learning targets); home (comparisons); food and lodging (connections); recently found (communities); favorites (communications); extras (cultures). Equipping students with strategies to help them reach their destinations will ensure that each student arrives at his/her proficiency goal. Students need a starting line (goal); the directions (strategies); and a finish line (assessment). Teachers provide these landmarks and even offer ‘road side assistance’ when students encounter problems. Teachers should approach each lesson as a new trip and provide their students with a map containing specific information, multiple paths to learning, and other tools to build student autonomy. At the beginning, students will set goals and at the end they will reflect on their journey.


Carmen Scoggins teaches Spanish at Watauga High School in beautiful Boone, North Carolina where she is also an adjunct Spanish and Foreign Language Methodology instructor at Appalachian State University. She earned a BS and MA in Spanish Education from Appalachian State and is a National Board Certified Teacher. Carmen is an active member of ACTFL, SCOLT, and FLANC. She is a past president of FLANC and currently serves on the SCOLT board as the Scholarship Director. She also serves on the World Language Collaborative Team for the Department of Public Instruction in North Carolina. In 2007 Carmen was FLANC’s Teacher of the Year and in 2008 she received the SCOLT Teacher of the Year honor.
Carmen has presented at the state, regional, and national levels on integrating technology into the World Language classroom and personalizing the language-learning experience. She is passionate about getting future World Language teachers involved in the profession. Carmen lives in Boone, North Carolina and is in her 20th year of education.


The IPA as a Framework for Thematic Units by Linda Quinn Allen

This presentation will provide attendees with the knowledge and resources needed to create theme-based instructional units that are constructed around the Integrated Performance Assessment. The IPA is a prototype developed by ACTFL that places the Standards of Foreign Language Learning at the forefront of instructional planning and promotes a seamless interface between instruction and assessment. Thematic units are ideal for establishing a meaningful context, interweaving culture into the curriculum, and relating instruction to students’ lives outside the classroom. The presenter will demonstrate how the IPA and the thematic unit can be combined to enrich language instruction. The presenter will share outlines of IPA-based thematic units and provide a template for attendees to use in their own instructional planning.


Dr. Linda Quinn Allen is an associate professor of French and coordinator of the World Language Teacher Education program at Iowa State University. Dr. Allen’s research interests are teacher cognition, world language teacher development, culture in world language instruction, and standards-based world language learning. She is a frequent conference presenter and her work appears in prominent journals in the field.

 


Keys to Planning for Student Learning: Linking Curriculum to Performance by Laura Terrill

Teachers need to understand the connection between the National Standards, the Common Core and 21st Century Skills and see foreign language examples at all levels of proficiency. Using sample units participants will then work from models showing how the ACTFL Proficiency and Performance Guidelines are used to state how well students should be able to meet curriculum goals at different levels. Participants will learn strategies that can be used as formative or summative assessments to provide feedback on how well individual learners are doing and data on how well program goals are being met. Examples provided will stress the use of web tools to enhance real-life application of tasks. The session will stress the importance of the feedback cycle for programs – clear curriculum goals, high yield instructional strategies and assessment to inform future instruction.


Laura Terrill taught French at all levels for 21 years before becoming the Coordinator of Foreign Language and English as a Second Language and then Director of Curriculum in the Parkway School District in St. Louis, MO. She has taught methods courses at Washington University in St. Louis and at Butler University and IUPUI in Indianapolis and continues to present frequently at the state, regional and national levels. She has served on the Board of Directors for Central States and ACTFL. She is the recipient of the Founders Award for Central States and has been named a NADSFL District Supervisor of the Year. She is currently working as an independent consultant.


Building Proficiency Using Classroom Formative Assessments by Priscilla Russel and Rosanne Zeppieri

Educational researchers underscore the positive effect of formative assessment on achievement and student engagement. In world languages classes, these ongoing assessments play a vital role in building proficiency in a systematic, focused way so that all learners acquire the vocabulary, structures, and functionality to communicate in real life situations. This presentation will define formative assessment, explain the process and its component parts, discuss methods of gathering evidence of student learning and the importance of analyzing that data to make instructional adaptations for individual learners, the role of descriptive feedback, and specific formative classroom tasks in the three modes of communication.


Priscilla Russel is the Supervisor of World Languages for the Princeton (New Jersey) Public Schools. Her department serves as a Model Resource center for the state of New Jersey. A frequent presenter at ACTFL and regional and state conferences for many years, she is known for her work using folktales and, more recently, with formative assessment. She has served on the board of NADSFL and as editor of the NNELL journal.


Rosanne Zeppieri, BA in French and MA in Educational Leadership, is an independent consultant and former supervisor of World Languages and teacher of French and Spanish. She initiated the World Languages program at the High Technology High School in Lincroft, NJ, and built the elementary and middle school programs in the West Windsor-Plainsboro Regional School District. Recently, she taught Methods of World Languages and Assessment in the World Languages Program at Rutgers University. Currently, she works as a supervisor for student teachers at Princeton University and Rider University, a consultant for STARTALK programs, and a professional development provider.


Real World Texts: Building Critical Thinking Skills and Cultural Understanding by Donna Clementi and Paul Sandrock

Language educators commonly express a need for strategies to develop cultural understanding without sacrificing the development of language skills, asking for repertoire to discuss culture in the target language. This presentation addresses that need by demonstrating strategies for using what language learners can do in the presentational and interpersonal modes to demonstrate their understanding in the interpretive mode. Whether at the novice, intermediate, or advanced level, language learners can use their language skills to access, explore, discuss, and share conclusions from a variety of online authentic texts (written, oral, or visual). Using tasks building on the strengths of the language learners’ level, educators can engage learners in analyzing, comparing, explaining, evaluating, and making inferences from authentic texts, while tapping learners’ knowledge of their own culture and the target cultures.


Donna Clementi is currently teaching foreign language methods at Lawrence University, Appleton, WI. She recently retired from Concordia Language Villages where she served in numerous positions for over 30 years, including Dean of the French Village and more recently as Director of Education and Research. She taught French for 33 years at Appleton West High School. She received the ACTFL Florence Steiner Award for Leadership in Foreign Language Education (K-12) and the Central States Founders Award. Donna is a frequent presenter at state, regional, and national conferences.


Paul Sandrock, Director of Education at the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL), directs this national organization’s professional development and initiatives around standards, curriculum, instruction, and performance assessment. Previously, Paul was Assistant Director of Content and Learning at the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, beginning that state's implementation of Common Core State Standards, and earlier served as the state consultant for world languages. Paul taught Spanish for 16 years in middle school and high school and authored The Keys to Assessing Language Performance and Planning Curriculum for Learning World Languages.


Common Core and Language Learning: Developing Literacy by Paul Sandrock

Common Core and World Languages are a perfect match. Through interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communication, students develop and practice literacy as described in the Common Core State Standards. Language educators use a wide variety of strategies to help learners make and express meaning, contributing to local conversations around literacy. At the same time, language educators gain a deeper understanding of how to improve learners’ language performance by examining the Common Core standards. In this session, participants experience various strategies for building literacy.


Paul Sandrock, Director of Education at the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL), directs this national organization’s professional development and initiatives around standards, curriculum, instruction, and performance assessment. Previously, Paul was Assistant Director of Content and Learning at the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, beginning that state's implementation of Common Core State Standards, and earlier served as the state consultant for world languages. Paul taught Spanish for 16 years in middle school and high school and authored The Keys to Assessing Language Performance and Planning Curriculum for Learning World Languages.


Taking on the Tough Guys: Homework, Grading and Feedback by Lisa Lilley

We know that motivation is the key to successful second language learning. Too often, though, educators fall back on traditional approaches to homework and grading that can diminish a student's persistence to higher levels of proficiency. The heavy load placed upon teachers makes it difficult to give effective and consistent feedback. This presentation will help educators inform their instruction by providing current research (Marzano, Hattie, and others) on homework, criterion based grading, formative and summative assessment. Additionally it is designed to examine the importance of effective feedback in providing motivation, and explore ways to provide it that aren't an extra burden upon the teacher. Audience participation will be encouraged throughout so that the participants can interact with the information presented as well as share their own ideas with others and learn from them too.


Lisa Lilley is a National Board Certified Teacher and the 2010 ACTFL National Language Teacher of the Year. Currently she is the Middle Years Program Coordinator for the International Baccalaureate Program at Central High School and Pipkin Middle School in Springfield, Missouri. She previously taught Spanish for 20 years at the middle and high school levels as well as a methods course at a local university. Lisa also served as chair of her district's curriculum development committee and was charged with providing professional learning opportunities for its world language teachers. Lisa serves as President of the Foreign Language Association of Missouri and is a member of the Central States Conference Board of Directors and a regional representative for the National Association of District Supervisors of Foreign Languages.


See What Goes on in the Classroom of the ACTFL National Language Teacher of the Year by Noah Geisel

How do we create globally competent students and what is the role of language study in this new order? Teachers will see how to integrate global content in lessons on a daily basis through various techniques and discuss how to create opportunities for students to use this knowledge in various disciplines. This presentation focuses on the integration of language study and displays student work that emphasizes communication, critical thinking and collaboration within the classroom and through technology. Student examples incorporating 21st century tools will be provided.


Noah Geisel has been teaching English, Spanish and Technology for 13 years. An addict of sharing and collaborating with other teachers, he is a constant on Twitter and was a contributing writer to the education blog TeachPaperless.com. His presentations have been selected Best of SWCOLT and Best of CSC. Noah is currently representing ACTFL as the 2013 National Language Teacher of the Year. He is a traveler, learner and hardcore fan of Duke basketball.